Stefana Fratila

Stefana Fratila – Dancing

Last month, newly-Toronto-based experimental pop generator Stefana Fratila took our breath away with her latest single “Dancing”, so we’re only too happy for another opportunity to highlight it with the release of her stunning and ambitious new music video. Directed by Elle-Máijá Tailfeathers, it’s a vivid vignette of misogyny, revenge, and victorious dancing that matches the various phases of the track to a T. As with all of Fratila’s work, we’re enthralled yet again.

“Dancing” is available now digitally and on VHS via Bandcamp, with all profits going towards Intersessions, ​a series of DJ workshops curated for and by women, gender-nonconforming & queer folks.

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Stefana Fratila – Dancing

Never before have we met a song so appropriately named. The ending of Stefana Fratila‘s new song is given away before you even press play: it’s going to be time to dance. Of course, she’s retained everything that made us fall for her back in 2015: breathy layers of vocals; varied production that keeps your ears guessing; an experimental approach to pop. Plus big, rhythmic beats. The previously-Vancouver-based artist obviously packed her drum machine when she moved to Toronto.

You can even order a physical copy (on VHS!), with an accompanying video, with proceeds going to Intersessions, a series of workshops for female, non-binary and queer folk who want to learn to DJ.

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Stefana Fratila – Edmonbomb

Stefana Fratila was one of our highlights of the year in experimental electronic pop in 2015, with her wonderful record Efemera providing endless discoveries upon repeated listening. The Romanian-born, Vancouver-based artist returns with a music video directed by Sara Wylie and shot partially by Fratila herself in an abandoned amusement park in Denpasar, Bali, and in Antigua, Guatemala, and the Pacific Northwest. It’s a dark moody piece that matches the track well, and in an interview with The Editorial, Fratila explains her choice of location as motivated by wanting to discuss colonialist narratives and shame.

Efemera is available now from Bandcamp.

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